May 19 2010

A History of Jewish Appointments to the U.S. Supreme Court

The following article was penned by “The Golden Age of Jewish Achievement” author Steven L. Pease and additionally published in the Huffington Post. Here, Mr. Pease discusses the history behind and remarkable rise of the Jewish community in American politics, dating back to almost a century ago.

Nothing is more important in U.S. law than the Supreme Court. It is the ultimate arbiter of decisions made in all other courts and it alone can decide if a law passed by Congress or a decision made by the administration is “unconstitutional.” Its importance is demonstrated by the constant fights in the U.S. Senate over the Senate’s role to “advise and consent” on appointments to the federal bench, including the appeals courts, and ultimately, the Supreme Court.

It took more than a century for a Jew to be appointed to the Supreme Court. Louis Brandeis became the first Jewish associate justice when he was confirmed in 1916. Continue reading

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May 12 2010

Kagan Seen as Brilliant, Affable and a Mystery

In the article below, the Jewish Telegraphic Agency discusses the story of Ms. Elena Kagan, a “steady, strategic and tactical” Jewish achiever and obvious notable addition for our section of ‘High Achievers and Other Interesting People ‘. “The Golden Age of Jewish Achievement” author Steven L. Pease was also interviewed about Ms. Kagan, noting that “…a third Jewish justice was not remarkable. Ms. Kagan would be seen as getting the job on her merits.

In the Jewish community Saperstein, the head of the Reform movement’s Religious Action Center , apparently is not alone.

Community reaction to Obama’s selection of Kagan, the U.S. solicitor general, is enthusiastic until officials consider what it is, exactly, she stands for.

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